History of Ontario's Cosmetic Pesticide Legislation Attempts

History of Ontario's Cosmetic Pesticide Legislation Attempts

Postby adminjt » Tue Nov 16, 2010 6:03 pm

Federal Private Members Bills on the prohibition of the use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes
http://www2.parl.gc.ca/Sites/LOP/LEGISI ... ist=search

40th Parliament - 3rd Session (March 3, 2010 - )
C-363
An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (prohibition of the use of chemical pesticides for certain purposes)
C-368
An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (prohibition of the use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes)

40th Parliament - 2nd Session (Jan. 26, 2009 - Dec. 30, 2009)
C-363
An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (prohibition of the use of chemical pesticides for certain purposes)
C-368
An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (prohibition of the use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes)

39th Parliament - 2nd Session (Oct. 16, 2007 - Sept. 7, 2008)
C-225
An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (prohibition of use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes)
C-302
An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (prohibition of use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes)

39th Parliament - 1st Session (April 3, 2006 - Sept. 14, 2007)
C-225
An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (prohibition of use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes)
C-302
An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (prohibition of use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes)

38th Parliament - 1st Session (Oct. 4, 2004 - Nov. 29, 2005)
C-370
An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (prohibition of use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes)

37th Parliament - 3rd Session (Feb. 2, 2004 - May 23, 2004)
C-236
An act to prohibit the use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes

37th Parliament - 2nd Session (Sept. 30, 2002 - Nov. 12, 2003)
C-236
An act to prohibit the use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes

37th Parliament - 1st Session (Jan. 29, 2001 - Sept. 16, 2002)
C-267
An Act to prohibit the use of chemical pesticides for non-essential purposes
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Nova Scotia House of Assembly - Law Amendments Committee

Postby adminjt » Tue Dec 28, 2010 9:43 pm

Nova Scotia House of Assembly - Law Amendments Committee Submissions
Sixty First General Assembly – Second Session
http://www.gov.ns.ca/legislature/commit ... /index.htm


Monday, May 10, 2010

Bill 61

IWK Health Centre
Landscape Nova Scotia
Environmental Health Association of Nova Scotia
Maureen Reynolds
Sierra Club Atlantic
Elizabeth Peirce
Town of Wolfville
Halifax Seed Company
Canadian Cancer Society
Ecology Action Centre
Helen Jones
Nova Scotia Liberal Caucus

http://www.gov.ns.ca/legislature/commit ... /index.htm
Bill No. 61 An Act to Prohibit the Sale and Use of Non-essential Pesticides
Hon. Sterling Belliveau
Minister of Environment
First Reading
May 4, 2010
(Second Reading Debates)

Second Reading May 6, 2010
Law Amendments Committee

http://gov.ns.ca/legislature/hansard/ha ... ay06.htm#H[Page%202088]

Standing Committee on Law Amendments



Hon. Ross Landry (Chair)
Howard Epstein Hon. Manning MacDonald
David Wilson (Vice Chair) Hon. Michel Samson
Gordie Gosse Hon. Murray Scott
Becky Kent Keith Bain


________________________________________
Contact: Gordon Hebb
Legislative Counsel
902-424-8941





http://www.gov.ns.ca/legislature/committees/law.html
Date: May 10, 2010
Time: 2:00 p.m.
Location: Red Chamber, Province House
Bills for consideration:

Bill No. 1 - House of Assembly Management Commission Act
(no representation)

Bill No. 61 - Non-essential Pesticides Control Act
(with representation)

Bill No. 64 - Electricity Act (amended)
(with representation)

Bill No. 65 - Homes for Special Care Act (amended)
(no representation)

Bill No. 68 - Public Utilities Act (amended)
(no representation)

http://www.gov.ns.ca/legislature/COMMIT ... hedla.html
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Re: History of Nova Scotia Pesticide Legislation Attempts

Postby adminjt » Tue Dec 28, 2010 10:58 pm

• Non-essential Pesticides Control Act (Bill No. 61)
http://www.gov.ns.ca/legislature/legc// ... d/b061.htm
Tue. May. 4 2010

N.S. bans sale of many lawn pesticides

The Canadian Press

HALIFAX — Nova Scotians won't be permitted to buy or apply many types of pesticides on their lawns beginning next spring.

Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau introduced a bill on Tuesday that would create a list of "low-risk" pesticides allowed for use on lawns, shrubs, residential trees and flowers.

The lawn care ban would begin next year, while the ban on pesticide used for shrubs, trees and flowers would begin in 2012.

"In this modern day, many recognize the wisdom in moving away from using pesticides in this way. We are making that same wise choice for our province," said Belliveau.

The bill reflects similar steps taken in Quebec. Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island have also passed restrictions.

Nova Scotia issued a discussion paper and sought input from the public over the winter on forbidding the use and sale of non-essential chemicals for cosmetic lawn care purposes. Belliveau said about 80 per cent of 1,700 submissions called for a ban.

The criteria for deciding which low-risk pesticides will be allowed in the province will be written into regulation this fall and then a list of permitted pesticides will be chosen.

Among the products that would be permitted are: corn glutens, used to smother weeds; acedic acid, also known a horticultural vinegar; and various herbicidal and insecticidal soaps.

David Thompson, president of Weedman in Nova Scotia, said the landscaping and weed-control industry will watch carefully to see how the province chooses the permitted products, but he was pleased Belliveau promised to consult with the industry in drawing up its list of permitted substances.

"We support legislation that protects the health of Nova Scotians, but for our industry it's all about having clear guidelines on what products we're allowed to use, having input on that and making sure those guidelines are based on science," he said.

Thompson said there is ample Health Canada research indicating the safety of various products, and the province should take that into account.

"We just want to know what products are going to pass muster and what rules are going to apply to what passes muster."

Chris Benjamin of the Ecology Action Centre said his group was generally pleased with the legislation because it places a ban on the sale of pesticides.

"It sounds like a lot of what we want," he said.

"Banning the sale is a huge step and extending the ban to the whole province is a huge step as well."

Andrew Younger, the Liberal environment critic, said his party is concerned the bill doesn't define precisely how the permitted products list will be determined and doesn't say who will enforce the legislation.

He said he doesn't believe that police will have time to enforce it, and he hopes that the province will encourage municipalities to set up bylaw officers to respond to violations.

"In my own neighbourhood, a large percentage of people do midnight weed and seed," he said.

"The fact of the matter is that's the kind of attitude you're going to get from people who don't want to obey the bylaw."

© 2010 CTVglobemedia All Rights Reserved.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/s ... hub=Canada

==========================

Tue. May 4 - 1:15 PM

Halifax Herald

N.S. to ban cosmetic pesticides
Commercial use in agriculture, forestry, golf courses still OK

By DAVID JACKSON Provincial Reporter

Nova Scotians will be able to use only "low-risk" pesticides on their lawns starting next spring.

Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau said this morning that the province is banning the sale and use of pesticides for cosmetic use on lawns.

The province will develop the list of approved pesticides in the coming months, Belliveau said.

The ban will extend to ornamental shrubs, flowers, and trees in 2012.

Commercial use of pesticides in agriculture, forestry and on golf courses is still permitted. Use on vegetable gardens is also exempt.

"Our basic goal is to reduce exposure," Belliveau said before tabling the Non-Essential Pesticides Control Act.

"Health Canada approves these products for use, but they also state that it is good practice to reduce or eliminate any unnecessary exposure to pesticides."

Belliveau said the measures are similar to pesticide restrictions in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island.

Kim MacNeil, executive director of the Environment Department, said examples of low-risk pesticides include corn gluten, which he said is essentially corn meal, acetic acid, various herbicidal and insecticidal soaps, and some bio-pesticides like Bt, an organism which kills insects after they eat it.

David Thompson, who works for the lawn care business Weed Man and is a member of Landscape Nova Scotia, said the effect on business will depend on how the permitted products list works.

He said the criteria for approving products in Halifax Regional Municipality, which has had a cosmetic pesticides ban for a decade, is unclear.

"It's been a challenge for industry to know which products we can use and can't use, so I was pleased that the minister stated that he would be consulting with industry in formulating regulations and creating that permitted list," Thompson said.

"We support legislation that protects the health of Nova Scotians. But for our industry, it's all about having clear guidelines on what products we're allowed to use, having input on that, and making sure those guidelines are based on science and medical evidence."

Maureen Summers, CEO of the Canadian Cancer Society, applauded the legislation.

She said there is growing evidence of a link between the use of pesticides and some cancers.

"Knowing we're a province that has the highest cancer rates in Canada, that we have to do everything possible to reduce risk for Nova Scotians," Summers said.

[These little guys will likely be safe thanks to a planned provincial ban on pesticides for cosmetic use announced today by Nova Scotia's NDP government. (TIM KROCHAK / Staff)</p>]

(djackson@herald.ca)

http://thechronicleherald.ca/Front/9016275.html

==========================

Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Nova Scotia banning lawn pesticides

CBC News

The proposed law bans pesticide use on lawns, not backyard gardens.The proposed law bans pesticide use on lawns, not backyard gardens. (CBC)

Nova Scotians won't be allowed to use pesticides on their lawns starting next spring

The NDP government introduced a bill Tuesday to ban the sale and use of non-essential pesticides across the province. It applies to lawn care in 2011, and trees, ornamental shrubs and flowers the following year.

"It is an opportunity put forward by our government to bring greater protection to our families and to our environment," said Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau.

The ban does not apply to farmers, forestry companies, golf courses and backyard vegetable gardens.

With so many loopholes, said Liberal MLA Andrew Younger, people will exploit the law.

Belliveau said there was widespread support for a ban on cosmetic pesticides during public consultations. His bill mirrors laws in Quebec, Ontario, New Brunswick and P.E.I.

Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, said there are safe alternatives to the pesticides that achieve the same result.

Lawn-care professionals told CBC News they also support the ban and are waiting to find out which products will be deemed acceptable.

The Halifax Regional Municipality banned the use of pesticides in 2003 but doesn't have the authority to prohibit their sale.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/st ... z0mzcAmIjw

==========================

Non-Essential Pesticides Ban for Nova Scotia
News - Environment
Tuesday, 04 May 2010 15:34

A proposed ban on the sale and use of non-essential pesticides will protect the health of Nova Scotia's environment and people across the province.


"Our public consultation response on this was overwhelmingly in favour of a ban," said Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau. "Medical experts and Nova Scotians agree this is the right solution for our province; it will protect our environment and make life better for families throughout the province."

The minister introduced a bill, today, May 4, titled An Act to Prohibit the Sale and Use of Non-essential Pesticides.

The sale and use of non-essential lawn care pesticides will not be permitted as of next spring. The ban will extend to ornamental shrubs, flowers and trees by spring 2012.

A list of low-risk pesticides which will be allowed for sale and use will be included in regulations.

"There are many uses for pesticides and each use needs to be looked at from a risk versus benefit perspective," said Dr. Robert Strang, Chief Medical Officer of Health for Nova Scotia.
"In regard to cosmetic purposes, there are safe and healthy alternative methods available, to achieve the same result."

Alternative pest-control practices will be encouraged through education and public outreach. The Department of Environment will work closely with industry, municipalities and non-governmental organizations to ensure they are aware of the regulations and informed of alternatives.

Health Canada has said it is good practice to reduce or eliminate unnecessary exposure to pesticides.

During public consultations,the Canadian Cancer Society, Doctors Nova Scotia, and the I.W.K. Health Centre, expressed support for a ban to reduce potential effects on human health.

Quebec, Ontario, New Brunswick, and P.E.I. have restrictions on non-essential pesticides use.

If the bill becomes law, regulations supporting the legislation would be developed over the next several months, with further input with municipalities, industry and non-governmental organizations.

The phased-in approach will give industry and homeowners time to prepare.

The ban will not apply to vegetable gardens, agriculture, golf courses or forestry.

For more information, visit www.gov.ns.ca/nse/pests .A proposed ban on the sale and use of non-essential pesticides will protect the health of Nova Scotia's environment and people across the province.

"Our public consultation response on this was overwhelmingly in favour of a ban," said Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau. "Medical experts and Nova Scotians agree this is the right solution for our province; it will protect our environment and make life better for families throughout the province."

The minister introduced a bill, today, May 4, titled An Act to Prohibit the Sale and Use of Non-essential Pesticides.

The sale and use of non-essential lawn care pesticides will not be permitted as of next spring. The ban will extend to ornamental shrubs, flowers and trees by spring 2012.

A list of low-risk pesticides which will be allowed for sale and use will be included in regulations.

"There are many uses for pesticides and each use needs to be looked at from a risk versus benefit perspective," said Dr. Robert Strang, Chief Medical Officer of Health for Nova Scotia.
"In regard to cosmetic purposes, there are safe and healthy alternative methods available, to achieve the same result."

Alternative pest-control practices will be encouraged through education and public outreach. The Department of Environment will work closely with industry, municipalities and non-governmental organizations to ensure they are aware of the regulations and informed of alternatives.

Health Canada has said it is good practice to reduce or eliminate unnecessary exposure to pesticides.

During public consultations,the Canadian Cancer Society, Doctors Nova Scotia, and the I.W.K. Health Centre, expressed support for a ban to reduce potential effects on human health.

Quebec, Ontario, New Brunswick, and P.E.I. have restrictions on non-essential pesticides use.

If the bill becomes law, regulations supporting the legislation would be developed over the next several months, with further input with municipalities, industry and non-governmental organizations.

The phased-in approach will give industry and homeowners time to prepare.

The ban will not apply to vegetable gardens, agriculture, golf courses or forestry.

For more information, visit www.gov.ns.ca/nse/pests .

Source: Nova Scotia Department Of Environment - Media Release - May 04, 2010

http://www.scotiaweb.ca/201005041779/no ... cotia.html

==========================
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