2,4-D Discussions (Killex and 50% of Agent Orange)

Various discussions related to Chemical Pesticides, Herbicides, Etc.

See 2,4-D risk in context

Postby adminjt » Sat Dec 18, 2010 6:24 pm

June 12, 2010

The Saskatchewan StarPhoenix

See 2,4-D risk in context

Bronwyn Eyre's column, Too much yellow in our green spaces (SP, June 5), described the presence of dandelions in public parks as a "civic disgrace."

She argues the city should be using 2,4-D because the Pest Management Regulatory Agency has deemed this herbicide as "safe."

The PMRA has never stated 2,4-D is safe, only that it poses an "acceptable risk." When the agency audits a pesticide product, it considers the health and environmental concerns verses the value or usefulness of the product.

In an agricultural context, where pesticides are applied by professionals among very sparse populations and serve the role of increasing crop yields, the argument for them is more compelling. However, in the urban setting, where untrained users apply pesticides in a densely populated area purely for aesthetic purposes, their use becomes much more controversial.

The Ontario College of Family Physicians in 2004 reviewed the health effects of pesticides and found evidence of "serious harmful effects including cancer, reproductive effects and impacts on the nervous system," and placed 2,4-D specifically on the list of harmful chemicals.

The Lung Association of Saskatchewan, the Canadian Cancer Society, and the Saskatoon Health Region all have taken a stance against the use of turf pesticides.

There are two sides to this debate, and we must consider both to make an informed decision. However, we must ask whether we are willing to risk our health for the sake of a yellow flower?

Greg Rooke
Pesticide reduction co-ordinator
Saskatchewan Environmental Society

© Copyright (c) The StarPhoenix

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/opinion/l ... z0qdGhKgsh

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3 Jun 2010

News Talk 650

Coordinator of Pest Reduction Program, Greg Rooke joins Brent to talk about pesticides, and what's legal in Saskatoon

Sound Off!
Click Here to Download This Episode
http://www.newstalk650.com/audio/brent- ... t-talk-abo

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2010

May 10: A Pesticide-Free Yard

Greg Rooke, Pesticide Reduction Coordinator for the Saskatchewan Environmental Society, will be giving tips on how to have a pesticide-free yard.

The cosmetic use of pesticides has significant impacts on human health, animals, plants, and the environment, and children are most exposed and vulnerable to the effects of pesticides. Medical experts are recommending that we reduce our use of pesticides in order to have a truly beautiful, healthy and safe city for everyone.

The upside is that maintaining our yards without the use of pesticides is totally doable. The best defense against pests is healthy plants. For example, having a healthy turf sward prevents weed invasion and disease such as fungal activity.

Spring is the best time of year to give your lawn the head start that it needs. Rake it to dethatch. Aerate it (hire someone or run around with a pitch fork, gently lifting). Fertilize. Overseed. Water and mow high.

http://www.environmentalsociety.ca/reso ... l#may10_10

Greg Rooke
Pesticide Reduction Coordinator
Saskatchewan Environmental Society
Email: pesticidefree@environmentalsociety.ca
Tel: (306) 665-1915
Fax: (306) 665-2128
http://www.environmentalsociety.ca/about/contact.html

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June 11, 2010

The Saskatchewan StarPhoenix

Life greener decades ago

During the 1940s and early '50s, when I lived in Rosthern, we had daily passenger train service to and from Saskatoon.

When I took the train to Saskatoon, I took my bicycle with me in the baggage car, at no cost. I could then use my bicycle to travel on the streets of Saskatoon. When I left Saskatoon to return home, I again put my bicycle in the baggage car, at no cost.

Jack Driedger
Saskatoon

© Copyright (c) The StarPhoenix

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/opinion/l ... z0qdG80JGa

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June 11, 2010

The Saskatchewan StarPhoenix

Pesticide ban wise

Re: Too much yellow in our green spaces (SP, June 5). Dandelions harm no one, but 2,4-D, the herbicide used to destroy them, is linked to cancer, neurological illness and reproductive problems.

This may explain why four provinces (Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia), along with three countries (Denmark, Norway and Sweden) have banned this chemical.

Isn't it time Saskatchewan followed the lead of our doctors, nurses and the Canadian Cancer Society and banned all non-essential pesticides? Doing so would protect drinking water, family pets and, most important, the province's children.

Gideon Forman
Executive Director, Canadian Assn. of Physicians for the Environment

© Copyright (c) The StarPhoenix

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/opinion/l ... story.html

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June 11, 2010

The Saskatchewan StarPhoenix

Sick of dandelion whine

The whining about weeds is reaching annoying proportions.

With all there is in the world to complain about, how can folks focus on what type of plants are growing in some patch of land they run across? Dandelions aren't prickly like thistles, after all.

Now imagine if those same people discovered they had illnesses related to herbicide use? Allergies, chemical sensitivities, early puberty, reduced male fertility, cancer and whatever else we don't know yet?

They'd do more than whine.

First off, dandelions were imported from Europe as a salad vegetable. Eat the leaves before the plant flowers and they're tender, crisp and have the same bitter taste of endive.

Pluck those yellow flowers and make wine. It's sweet, rich, and tangy. Lastly, dig up those carroty roots, dry them, grind them and use them to stretch out your coffee and save some money.

Pet owners can feed the leaves and flowers to birds and rabbits and rodents.

If we ever suffer an end times, this food might save you. Harvest this manna of the fields and quit complaining. Grass is the most useless plant you could have.

Yolanda vanPetten
Saskatoon

© Copyright (c) The StarPhoenix

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/opinion/l ... z0qdFbJepU

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